2020 NFL draft: Damien Lewis scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about LSU offensive line prospect Damien Lewis

Damien Lewis | OL | Louisiana State

Elevator Pitch

Lewis is a road grader at the offensive guard position. He clears paths in the run game. However, he is very limited in pass protection. With the right blocking scheme, Lewis could be a good piece for a team that believes in establishing the run.

Vitals

Height | 6-2

Weight | 327

Class | Senior

College Stats

College Bio

Strengths

Road grader, bulldozer. Whatever term you want to use here, Damien Lewis is a path clearer in the run game. His size and brute strength allows him to blow defensive lineman off the ball at the point of attack. He will get the second level looking to plow the first linebacker or defensive back that he can set his sights on. Defenders would do well to avoid him if at all possible.

Given his strength, bull rushers will have a hard time gaining any traction against Lewis. When he can’t hold off the rush, does a good job of dropping his anchor to stonewall any attempts to get through him to get to the quarterback. He will maul defenders and wide gaps for ball carriers to get through.

Weaknesses

Limited athlete in space. While his calling card is run blocking, pass blocking is on the other end of the spectrum. He lacks the lateral quickness and footwork to deal with stunts, twists and speed rushers. Teams will need to allocate help to his side at times.

Technique with his pass sets and hand placement are lacking. His hand placement can be a bit wide at times. Needs to narrow that aspect of his game. Fixing his technique will help alleviate some of the issues for Lewis. Needs to be quicker with his footwork.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Jonah Jackson scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Ohio State offensive line prospect Jonah Jackson

Jonah Jackson | OL | Ohio State

Elevator Pitch

Jackson spent four seasons at Rutgers before transferring to Ohio State for his final year of eligibility. Jackson is an interior lineman prospect who could play center or guard at the NFL level. Likely being a backup to start his career but could find his way into the starting lineup early on.

Vitals

Height | 6-3

Weight | 306

Class | Redshirt Senior

College Stats

College Bio

Strengths

Jackson provides flexibility at the NFL level that will make him an attractive option as general managers and front offices look to build their rosters. He can be an option at both guard and at center. A player who can fill the role of guard and center would allow teams to focus roster spots elsewhere with a player like Jackson.

He does a good job of looking for work, never a player that stands and watches. He can get to the second level to create holes for the running game. Isn’t a mauler but does play with a sense of urgency and aggression at the guard position. Can handle twists and stunts well.

Weaknesses

Technique is a work in progress for Jackson. At times it appears as if he isn’t quite sure what to do with his hands. Needs to be quicker with his punch early in his sets. His length at the position is average so that might be a disadvantage for him. Really needs to hone his technique to find the field early on in his career.

Jackson stands too tall when getting into his sets, will need to work on that bend. This if one of the detriments to his game. Teams will need to focus on getting the technique right. His base is a bit narrow and needs to widen out to help with his blocking. Can be a bit of a project but still has traits that teams will love.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Logan Stenberg scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Kentucky offensive line prospect Logan Stenberg

Logan Stenberg | OL | Kentucky

Elevator Pitch

Stenberg is a nasty finisher and mauler from his offensive guard spot. A multi-year starter for Kentucky is a plug and play offensive lineman for a team that like to run power football. In close quarters, Stenberg can be a factor in establishing dominance in the trenches.

Vitals

Height | 6-6

Weight | 317

Class | Senior

College Stats

College Bio

Strengths

Stenberg does a good job of latching onto his defender and is able to sustain his blocks well. His hands can be like vice grips in that when he locks onto a defensive lineman, odds that a defender can shed his block are very minimal at best. Plays with a mauler like attitude and demeanor. When he gets pushback with a bullrush, Stenberg is able to sit down and anchor. He shows tremendous strength.

He can be a stonewall at the point of attack in his pass sets. Does well to keep pass rushers at bay even when trying for quick moves inside. Shows good footwork and doesn’t get beaten much with twists and stunts. Good football IQ and understanding of his assignments and what the defense is trying to do up front.

Weaknesses

His biggest weakness might be his flexibility or lack there of. He doesn’t provide the ability to be much in terms of getting out in space when asked to pull. His lack of balance is on full display. Moving lateral is virtually non-existent for him.

Stengerg is very stiff as an athlete, so again, it will really limit what he can do at the NFL level. Coming out of his stance, he stands straight up at the line of scrimmage most often. There is absolutely zero bend from his stance which can cause him problems with leverage.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Shane Lemieux scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Oregon offensive line prospect Shane Lemieux

Shane Lemieux | OL | Oregon

Elevator Pitch

A four-year starter at guard on a talented Oregon offensive line, Lemieux is a reliable blocker who plays with a high motor and a mean streak. He can stand to improve as a pass protector, and his technique can be sharpened up a bit, but he has the potential to develop into a solid starter with time.

Vitals

Height | 6-4

Weight | 310

College Bio Page

Strengths

While some offensive linemen in this class have more flash than Lemieux does, there aren’t too many players that have the grit that he has.

A portly and well-proportioned blocker, Lemieux has a wide frame that packs plenty of raw strength into it. He packs a powerful punch at the point of attack and has the grip strength to latch onto a defender and seal them off to create running lanes for his teammates. His lower body also carries plenty of strength, as he keeps his legs churning when engaged with his opponents to drive them back and pound them into the dirt. That power also helps him in pass protection, where he has the recovery strength in his anchor and core to neutralize bull rushes and other power rushes.

Lemieux plays with a high motor and fights hard on every down to win the rep. He has shown some capabilities of being able to block on the move, as he takes good angles as a down blocker or a pull blocker to create holes in the ground game. He has an impressive resume too, as he was a four-year starter at left guard who was named a second-team All-American by the Associated Press. His reputation as a leader on Oregon’s offensive line should help further boost his appeal.

Weaknesses

Though Lemieux brings a high floor to the table, he doesn’t bring a sky-high ceiling. He isn’t a stellar athlete, as while he can block with coordination at the second level and while on the move, he doesn’t have very good lateral agility in pass protection. He tends to struggle against stunting edge rushers, blitzes, and explosive and slipper interior defenders.

Lemieux has some technical flaws to his game, as well. His pad level is inconsistent, and he could stand to sink his hips on more of a regular basis and avoiding shooting upright. He has shown some flashes in his hand placement, but there are times when his strikes are misplaced and mistimed. His overall range as a blocker is fairly limited.

Projection: Day 3

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2020 NFL draft: Isaiah Wilson scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Georgia offensive tackle prospect Isaiah Wilson

Isaiah Wilson | OT | Georgia

Elevator Pitch

Wilson is a massive individual who brings plenty of raw power, nastiness and potential at the next level. He’s a work in progress, but the upside is there for him to be a solid starter at the next level.

Vitals

Height | 6-6

Weight | 350

College Bio Page

Strengths

You don’t even need to watch Wilson’s tape to determine one of his strengths; one look at him tells the story.

Wilson is absolutely huge, even by offensive line standards. The second-heaviest player to attend the Combine this year, the Georgia product has a hulking frame with a wide chest, a strong lower body and broad shoulders. That bulk correlates to his play strength, as he packs a powerful punch at the point of attack. He has consistent grip strength and is able to overwhelm defenders at the point of attack. Once he grips onto an opponent, he has the drive in his lower body and the nasty edge in his game to knock them backwards and finish them off.

With the run-heavy offense Georgia tends to run, Wilson has plenty of experience blocking in the ground game and excels there the most. He has some potential as a pass blocker though, as he has shown solid lateral quickness and footwork for someone as big as he is. When he gets his hands placed correctly, he does a solid job of finishing the defender off and locking that defender out of the play entirely.

Weaknesses

Wilson is definitely a work in progress and will likely require a year on the bench. He doesn’t play with good body control and can struggle maintaining his balance, whether it be when he advances to the second level or when he lunges forward and mistimes his jabs. His hand placement can be hit or miss, which can allow defenders to slip underneath him. That can be difficult for him to counter, seeing as he doesn’t play with stellar pad level or flexibility in his lower half.

Though it isn’t a surprise considering how big he is, Wilson is a bit stiff-hipped and struggles with adjusting his set points and rotating to square up to the defender in pass protection. There are times where he loses to an edge rusher going forward with a speed rush, so he enters recovery mode and begins running instead of shuffling along with them. He’s also declaring as a redshirt sophomore, so there is some slight inexperience there, even though he was a two-year starter at Georgia.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Solomon Kindley scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Georgia offensive line prospect Solomon Kindley

Solomon Kindley | OL | Georgia

Elevator Pitch

Kindley is a powerful and nasty interior blocker who plays with a mauler mentality and packs plenty of strength in a wide frame. He’s not the greatest athlete you’ll find on the offensive line, but he’s a take-no-prisoners lineman who can start in the NFL down the line.

Vitals

Height | 6-3

Weight | 337

College Bio Page

Strengths

At 337 pounds, Kindley is a mammoth of an offensive lineman, and that bulky frame translates well to his play strength.

Kindley has tree trunks for legs and generates plenty of drive in his lower body when he locks up with a defender. He plays with a high motor and fights hard to drive his opponents into the dirt on a down-by-down basis. He also packs a powerful punch at the point of attack, and when he grips onto a defender, he is able to lock them up and manhandle them, especially in run support. The Georgia offense places a lot of importance in the ground game, and that experience shows up in Kindley’s game, as he excels at sealing off defenders and opening up holes for his teammates.

A two-year starter who also started in nearly half of the games in the 2017 season, Kindley has shown some promise in regards to his hand placement, as he can dominate once he places his strikes correctly. For such a heavy offensive lineman, he plays with solid footwork in pass protection and has demonstrated good overall patience and some short-area burst at times. He can accelerate to the second level better than one would expect for his size.

Weaknesses

Kindley’s raw power comes at the expense of consistent agility. Though he’s not bad for his size, he can’t change direction incredibly well, and his lack of lateral quickness in pass protection puts him in precarious positions at times. His flexibility from the waist down could be improved, and while he has the raw power to overwhelm defenders, he can do a better job of sinking his hips into contact at times. He doesn’t play with optimal body control when climbing to the second level, as he struggles with maintaining a balance frame on the move.

That lack of balance also can come into play when Kindley lunges, which is a bit of a reoccurring trend on his tape. He can do a better job of consistently maintaining proper hand placement, too. When an edge rusher cuts inside on a stunt or an interior defender fires off the snap, he sometimes struggles with squaring himself up to the defender and adjusting his hips to get in their way.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Ben Bredeson scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Michigan offensive line prospect Ben Bredeson

Ben Bredeson | OL | Michigan

Elevator Pitch

Bredeson is a tenacious and powerful interior offensive lineman who possesses leadership qualities and can help a team in the trenches and in the locker room. While he has his athletic limitations, he can develop into a solid starter in time.

Vitals

Height | 6-5

Weight | 315

College Bio Page

Strengths

If you’re looking for a hard-nosed interior blocker with determination to spare, Bredeson is your guy.

A four-year starter at Michigan, Bredeson made an immediate impact in college, and part of that was due in part to the pure power in his game. He has a well-built frame with very good length and good proportions. He packs a powerful punch at the point of attack and has the grip strength to latch onto a defender and overwhelm his opponents. His anchor strength is also impressive, as he has the raw strength to recover from a power move and counter it with a pushback of his own. When he latches his hands inside your shoulder pads, it’s game over.

Bredeson is an intelligent blocker who does a good job of picking up blitzes and contributing with combo blocks and double teams. He has shown some potential in terms of his hand placement, as he can effectively land his strikes at times. He also brings value off the field, as he was named a team captain in both of his final two seasons at Michigan and has a reputation for being a positive force in the locker room.

Weaknesses

For all of the power Bredeson brings to the table, he doesn’t complement it incredibly well with athletic abilities. His lateral agility is below average, as he struggles with changing direction and doesn’t move around too fluidly in pass protection. He doesn’t have stellar acceleration when climbing to the second level as a run blocker, and his overall flexibility on pull blocks and down blocks could be improved.

As a part of this lack of high-end athleticism, Bredeson can struggle with sinking his hips and staying low at the point of attack at times. His pad level and overall body control isn’t very consistent, and he can be knocked off balance at times by forceful or quick-moving defenders.

Projection: Day 3

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2020 NFL draft: Ben Bartch scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about St. John’s offensive line prospect Ben Bartch

Ben Bartch | OL | St. John’s (MN)

Elevator Pitch

Bartch is a small-school converted tight end who will likely need to redshirt his rookie year, but his length, athleticism and power makes him an intriguing developmental prospect. Considering how far he’s come in just two years of playing as an offensive lineman, there’s no reason to think he can’t continue to develop and grow as a player.

Vitals

Height | 6-6

Weight | 309

College Bio Page

Strengths

Since Bartch stepped onto the campus at St. John’s, he has put on roughly 75 pounds of good weight, managing to add power to a skill set that has maintained some of that tight end athleticism.

Bartch packs a powerful punch at the point of attack and blocks with heavy hands overall. His grip strength is strong once he latches onto a defender, and he does a good job of sealing off running lanes for his teammates. He plays with a high motor and has shown the willingness to drive his opponents into the dirt. For a Division III player to be considered an NFL prospect, it’s important that they dominate their competition, and Bartch certainly did that. He also moves around well in pass protection, showing off solid overall athletic ability. He accelerates well when he climbs up to the second level.

Another surprising aspect about Bartch’s game is that he’s much more technically refined than one would expect for a D-III tackle with only two years of offensive line experience. His ability to process the given situation and understand key points like pad level, hand placement and angles to take at the point of attack is admittedly better than a handful of Power 5 tackles in this class who have much more experience at the position than he does. He’s not perfect, sure, but the significant progress he has made in such a short amount of time is definitely encouraging. He projects well as either a tackle or a guard, and that versatility could make him intriguing.

Weaknesses

Bartch spent his first two collegiate seasons as a tight end and only has two seasons of experience at offensive tackle to his name. That inexperience can show up on tape at times, and while he got away with it most of the time against lesser competition, that may be much tougher in the NFL. His set point approach coming out of his stance could use a little more variation, as his current approach is a bit too closed in and can leave him prone to speed rushes around the edge. While he’s a solid athlete, his footwork is a bit unpolished.

There have certainly been flashes of fundamentals like pad level and hand placement in Bartch’s game, but they haven’t been consistent quite yet. He can improve on placing his strikes inside of the opponents’ shoulders on a regular basis, and he doesn’t always sink his hips into contact to stay low and maintain leverage. There’s potential in that regard, but he’s still a work in progress.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Robert Hunt scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Louisiana-Lafayette offensive line prospect Robert Hunt

Robert Hunt | OL | Louisiana-Lafayette

Elevator Pitch

Whether you project him as a tackle or a guard, Hunt is a dancing bear of an offensive line prospect who has the raw play strength and the mobility to be a quality NFL starter. He’s a bit raw from a technical standpoint, but if he can clean up his game a bit, he has a high ceiling in the pros.

Vitals

Height | 6-5

Weight | 323

College Bio Page

Strengths

To be blunt, Hunt is a massive individual.

He possesses very good height and overall length, and he has a well-proportioned frame with plenty of raw strength packed into it. His powerful upper body allows him to redirect defenders and seal off lanes as a run blocker with ease, and he has good recovery strength in his anchor. Hunt blocks with a high motor and has shown the willingness to pound a defender into the dirt. He packs a powerful punch at the point of attack and is able to easily latch onto his opponents with formidable grip strength.

Hunt is also an impressive athlete for his size, as the nimbleness and overall agility he shows in his footwork is certainly apparent on film. He changes direction well in pass protection and has the athletic ability to climb to the second level with good acceleration and body control. As a four-year collegiate starter who has experience at both tackle positions and as a guard, he should be able to hold plenty of value early in his career through his versatility.

Weaknesses

While Hunt has the physical tools to be successful, he’s still a work in progress. His hand placement can stand to be more consistent, as while he has been dominant when he places his strikes well, he ends up misplacing them too often. He is also prone to leaving himself susceptible to letting defenders into his frame, making it tougher for him to gain leverage.

Hunt’s pad level could use some improvement, too. He tends to struggle with staying low and sinking his hips into contact. His ability to adjust his set points and make sure he doesn’t overset can be improved. As a pass protector, his footwork can fall apart at times, and while he got away with it in college due to his raw athleticism, polished edge rushers in the NFL will take advantage of it to knock him off balance. He is also coming off of a groin injury that ended his 2019 season and forced him to miss both the Senior Bowl and the Combine.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Nick Harris scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Washington offensive line prospect Nick Harris

Nick Harris | OL | Washington

Elevator Pitch

A polished and determined interior offensive line prospect who brings athleticism and coordination to the table, Harris has the potential to step in and be a solid starter at the next level. Despite his deficiencies, he has plenty of tools in his game to warrant looks late on Day 2 of the draft.

Vitals

Height | 6-1

Weight | 302

College Bio Page

Strengths

If Harris were even two inches and 10 pounds of muscle heavier, there’s a solid chance we’d be looking at him as a possible first-round pick.

Harris brings impressive athleticism to the center position. He has good lateral quickness, as he can move around well in pass protection and execute down blocks with efficiency. He climbs to the second level well when called upon to do so, and he is able to maintain good coordination and body control when moving to block linebackers or defensive backs. His overall fluidity allows him to rotate his hips and adjust his frame to square up to defenders.

Centers are known for being some of the smartest players on the football field, and that rings true with Harris. He does a good job of adjusting his set points and figuring out which sets to use on a given play. He communicates well with his teammates to slide protection or make other adjustments at the line of scrimmage. When asked to block on a zone play, he is able to clear out his zone effectively and understand what his assignment is on said play. His intelligence translates to his technique too, as he plays with great leverage in his pads and sinks into contact well to get his weight underneath him. He plays with a high motor and also possesses impressive determination and grip strength when he locks up with a defender.

Weaknesses

The big issue with Harris as a prospect has to do with a lack of an NFL build. He’s short for an offensive lineman and doesn’t have significant muscle weight in his frame. His lack of length limits his range as a blocker a bit, and he could stand to pack on a few more pounds of muscle and strengthen his core a bit. That lack of bulk shows up on tape sometimes, as his anchor strength can be improved in order to get better against powerful interior defenders at the next level. While he weighed in at over 300 pounds at the Combine, he played at well under that mark in his collegiate career.

Harris’ hand placement has shown some promise, but there are times where he ends up misplacing his strikes and failing to maintain proper leverage in that regard. He has an occasional tendency to hold onto defenders when the play doesn’t go according to plan, which will need to be cleaned up a bit at the next level.

Projection: Day 2

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