2020 NFL draft: Saahdiq Charles scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about LSU offensive tackle prospect Saahdiq Charles

Saahdiq Charles | OT | LSU

Elevator Pitch

Charles is an athletic offensive tackle prospect who possesses intriguing quickness, flexibility and footwork for someone his size. He could stand to work on his technique and strength a bit, and his suspension this past year may need some digging into, but the potential is palpable in his skill set.

Vitals

Height | 6-4

Weight | 321

College Bio Page

Strengths

Charles’ athletic abilities should see him high in demand after the first tier of offensive tackles comes off the board in this year’s class.

A nimble lineman who moves around better than most his size, Charles has very good lateral quickness and possesses impressive footwork and body control when moving around. He changes direction well, allowing him to counter speed rushes and adjust his set points to close off the possibility of a defender bouncing inside against him. His acceleration climbing to the second level is impressive, and he has the athleticism and awareness to make adjustments and position himself to take on incoming defenders or blitzes. He has shown some potential in his flexibility, as he can bend pretty well when he maintains the composure to do so.

A three-year starter who has only been playing as an offensive lineman for four years, Charles possesses an enticing experience-room to grow combination and is continually getting better as he adjusts to the position. He has some experience as a guard too, which may help him get additional playing time early on in his career. His athletic abilities, as well as the flashes of potential he’s shown when he gets his technique down, give him a high ceiling at the next level.

Weaknesses

Charles weighed significantly more at the Combine than he was listed as at LSU, and while he did need to pack on weight, it remains to be seen if that weight gain will translate to added play strength. On tape, he didn’t pack much of a punch at the point of attack and didn’t have enough of a mauler playing style to drive defenders into the dirt. He struggles at times with recovering from speed-to-power conversions against him, and his overall core strength is pretty average.

Part of his power struggles stem from his technique, as he doesn’t play with optimal pad level and can do better at maintaining leverage. He can also improve the consistency in his hand placement and can allow defenders inside his frame a bit too easily. His ability to re-set his hands isn’t all that great yet, and he has a tendency to lunge from time to time. Charles was suspended for six games in 2019 for disciplinary reasons, and while the exact cause of the suspension is unknown, teams will certainly have to do some digging in that regard.

Projection: 3rd-4th Round

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2020 NFL draft: Matt Peart scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about UConn offensive tackle prospect Matt Peart

Matt Peart | OT | UConn

Elevator Pitch

A high-ceiling tackle prospect with a lengthy frame and commendable athleticism for his size, Peart has the physical tools to be a high-quality offensive lineman at the next level. Though he’s pretty raw and can add some more muscle to his frame, the upside he offers should help his draft stock a bit.

Vitals

Height | 6-7

Weight | 318

College Bio Page

Strengths

Coaches like length at the offensive tackle position, and Peart has that in spades.

A giant who measured with the longest arms at the Combine, Peart has fantastic measurables for his position. His arms alone give him plenty of range as a blocker, but that length is complemented by impressive speed and agility. He moves well laterally in pass protection and is light on his feet when changing direction. He has the burst coming out of his stance – as well as sustainable speed – to keep up with athletic edge rushers off the snap. When climbing to the second level, he accelerates quickly and has the body control to maintain blocks while on the move, which also helps out in down-blocking situations.

Peart also has shown that he can play with a nasty edge at times, demonstrating flashes of grip strength that can overwhelm opposing defenders. He offers versatility along the offensive line, having played as both a tackle and a guard at UConn. He was also a four-year starter, so he has plenty of experience and plenty of tape to go off of, and his growth as a blocker is apparent.

Weaknesses

Though his athletic upside will see Peart drafted highly, his rawness as a blocker will more than likely prevent him from going higher than Day 2. He has a skinny frame and doesn’t possess much raw power in his lower body. That underwhelming strength is affected more so by his subpar pad level, as he doesn’t do a great job of sinking his hips and staying low to get his weight underneath him. It’s not a matter of flexibility with him, as he is a quality athlete, but rather composure. He fails to generate significant force or drive in his legs.

Peart can also stand to improve his hand placement a bit. While he has shown some flashes in that regard, he can be more consistent at places his strikes correctly and making sure not to lunge at opposing defenders. He weighed in heavier at the Combine than he ever did at UConn, but time will tell if that weight was fluctuated, or if it wasn’t, if that weight translates to more power.

Projection: Day 3

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2020 NFL draft: Isaiah Wilson scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Georgia offensive tackle prospect Isaiah Wilson

Isaiah Wilson | OT | Georgia

Elevator Pitch

Wilson is a massive individual who brings plenty of raw power, nastiness and potential at the next level. He’s a work in progress, but the upside is there for him to be a solid starter at the next level.

Vitals

Height | 6-6

Weight | 350

College Bio Page

Strengths

You don’t even need to watch Wilson’s tape to determine one of his strengths; one look at him tells the story.

Wilson is absolutely huge, even by offensive line standards. The second-heaviest player to attend the Combine this year, the Georgia product has a hulking frame with a wide chest, a strong lower body and broad shoulders. That bulk correlates to his play strength, as he packs a powerful punch at the point of attack. He has consistent grip strength and is able to overwhelm defenders at the point of attack. Once he grips onto an opponent, he has the drive in his lower body and the nasty edge in his game to knock them backwards and finish them off.

With the run-heavy offense Georgia tends to run, Wilson has plenty of experience blocking in the ground game and excels there the most. He has some potential as a pass blocker though, as he has shown solid lateral quickness and footwork for someone as big as he is. When he gets his hands placed correctly, he does a solid job of finishing the defender off and locking that defender out of the play entirely.

Weaknesses

Wilson is definitely a work in progress and will likely require a year on the bench. He doesn’t play with good body control and can struggle maintaining his balance, whether it be when he advances to the second level or when he lunges forward and mistimes his jabs. His hand placement can be hit or miss, which can allow defenders to slip underneath him. That can be difficult for him to counter, seeing as he doesn’t play with stellar pad level or flexibility in his lower half.

Though it isn’t a surprise considering how big he is, Wilson is a bit stiff-hipped and struggles with adjusting his set points and rotating to square up to the defender in pass protection. There are times where he loses to an edge rusher going forward with a speed rush, so he enters recovery mode and begins running instead of shuffling along with them. He’s also declaring as a redshirt sophomore, so there is some slight inexperience there, even though he was a two-year starter at Georgia.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Ezra Cleveland scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Boise State offensive tackle prospect Ezra Cleveland

Ezra Cleveland | OT | Boise State

Elevator Pitch

Cleveland is a lengthy and athletic tackle prospect who checks plenty of boxes in the physical tools department. He needs to work on his play strength and clean some things up from a technical perspective, but he has the upside to develop into a solid starter at either tackle position.

Vitals

Height | 6-6

Weight | 311

College Bio Page

Strengths

Though he broke out onto the scene with an impressive Combine performance, Cleveland’s tape shows that his athleticism was apparent throughout college.

A three-year starter at the collegiate level, Cleveland brings plenty of intrigue with his lengthy frame and his athletic abilities. He accelerates well when he climbs to the second level and has good overall quickness when tasked as a down blocker. That speed and acceleration was reflected in his 40-yard dash at the Combine, as he ran a 4.93 time with a 1.74 10-yard split that is fantastic for an offensive lineman. He moves with good footwork and sound body control in pass protection, as he can change direction well and mirror the movements of edge rushers pretty consistently.

Cleveland has shown that he has raw power in his upper body and can physically overwhelm the opposition when he gets proper hand placement. He has flashed the ability to seal off defenders in the run game, and he can re-set his hands well and fight hard to maintain leverage with his hands. A two-time All-Mountain West first-team lineman, Cleveland has been an anchor for a Boise State offensive line that has produced 1,000-yard rushers in every season he was a starter.

Weaknesses

Consistent technique and play strength are occurring issues on Cleveland’s film. Part of that stems from his inability to regularly sink his hips and get his weight underneath him when he blocks. He has a tendency to block from an upright stance, even with the natural athleticism he possesses. His hip work as a pass protector could use some more precision in the angles he takes to edge rushers.

Cleveland doesn’t have top-notch anchor strength, which prevents him from being able to drive many defenders back a considerable amount. His recovery strength against power moves could be improved, and he could struggle early on in his career against bull rushes and powerful jabs from NFL edge rushers. He can also get better at consistently getting inside hand placement, as his strikes can stand to be a bit more precise.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Ben Bartch scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about St. John’s offensive line prospect Ben Bartch

Ben Bartch | OL | St. John’s (MN)

Elevator Pitch

Bartch is a small-school converted tight end who will likely need to redshirt his rookie year, but his length, athleticism and power makes him an intriguing developmental prospect. Considering how far he’s come in just two years of playing as an offensive lineman, there’s no reason to think he can’t continue to develop and grow as a player.

Vitals

Height | 6-6

Weight | 309

College Bio Page

Strengths

Since Bartch stepped onto the campus at St. John’s, he has put on roughly 75 pounds of good weight, managing to add power to a skill set that has maintained some of that tight end athleticism.

Bartch packs a powerful punch at the point of attack and blocks with heavy hands overall. His grip strength is strong once he latches onto a defender, and he does a good job of sealing off running lanes for his teammates. He plays with a high motor and has shown the willingness to drive his opponents into the dirt. For a Division III player to be considered an NFL prospect, it’s important that they dominate their competition, and Bartch certainly did that. He also moves around well in pass protection, showing off solid overall athletic ability. He accelerates well when he climbs up to the second level.

Another surprising aspect about Bartch’s game is that he’s much more technically refined than one would expect for a D-III tackle with only two years of offensive line experience. His ability to process the given situation and understand key points like pad level, hand placement and angles to take at the point of attack is admittedly better than a handful of Power 5 tackles in this class who have much more experience at the position than he does. He’s not perfect, sure, but the significant progress he has made in such a short amount of time is definitely encouraging. He projects well as either a tackle or a guard, and that versatility could make him intriguing.

Weaknesses

Bartch spent his first two collegiate seasons as a tight end and only has two seasons of experience at offensive tackle to his name. That inexperience can show up on tape at times, and while he got away with it most of the time against lesser competition, that may be much tougher in the NFL. His set point approach coming out of his stance could use a little more variation, as his current approach is a bit too closed in and can leave him prone to speed rushes around the edge. While he’s a solid athlete, his footwork is a bit unpolished.

There have certainly been flashes of fundamentals like pad level and hand placement in Bartch’s game, but they haven’t been consistent quite yet. He can improve on placing his strikes inside of the opponents’ shoulders on a regular basis, and he doesn’t always sink his hips into contact to stay low and maintain leverage. There’s potential in that regard, but he’s still a work in progress.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Lucas Niang scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about TCU offensive tackle prospect Lucas Niang

Lucas Niang | OT | TCU

Elevator Pitch

Niang is a massive and athletic offensive tackle prospect who brings plenty of physical upside to the table. He plays with heavy hands and can move around well in space, giving him the raw power and the agility to project well at the next level. His technique could be improved, but the upside he brings should find him selected on Day 2 if the medicals check out.

Vitals

Height | 6-6

Weight | 315

College Bio Page

Strengths

Niang brings plenty of enticing physical tools to work with at the offensive tackle position.

His length offers plenty of intrigue, and his frame still carries more room to get in better shape, so the potential from a physical standpoint is definitely there. He has shown some impressive lateral agility when healthy, moving very well for somebody his size and advancing to the second level seamlessly. His footwork and overall quickness allows him to counter speed rushes in pass protection and keep up with explosive defenders off the snap.

In addition to his quickness for such a big tackle, Niang also possesses plenty of power in his game. He plays with good grip strength when he engages with defenders, allowing him to seal off running lanes for his teammates and knock defenders out of place. He packs a powerful punch at the point of attack and drives his legs when engaged with an opponent. A two-year full-time starter who took over the starting right tackle spot in the middle of the 2017 season, Niang has plenty of experience as a collegiate starter, as well.

Weaknesses

Niang was shut down for the 2019 season in November with a hip injury that he had been playing through since the year before. The injury prevented him from taking part in Combine drills, so he’ll have to rely on the medicals checking out on him. Playing through that ailment had a bit of an effect on his 2019 tape, as he didn’t look as nimble and flexible in his hips while playing hurt. His ability to adjust his set points was hurt by the injury, too. He’ll have to prove that his athleticism will come back to full form upon recovering.

While he has impressive physical traits, Niang’s technique could be improved upon a bit. He struggles with his hand placement at times, as while he shows potential when he places his punches correctly, there are times he mistimes or is inaccurate with his punches. He could also do a better job of working on his pad level and consistently fighting to get leverage in the form of maintaining lower pads.

Projection: Day 2

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2020 NFL draft: Austin Jackson scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about USC offensive tackle prospect Austin Jackson

Austin Jackson | OT | USC

Elevator Pitch

Jackson has plenty of physical tools and the upside to develop into a quality starting left tackle at the next level. His length and top-notch athleticism for the position gives him palpable potential, but his lack of technique will cause him problems early in his career. He’s a boom-or-bust prospect whose upside could persuade a team to use a fairly early pick on him.

Vitals

Height | 6-5

Weight | 322

College Bio Page

Strengths

There’s a lot to be intrigued about when evaluating Jackson’s prospects at the next level.

A lengthy tackle with a long wingspan and solid bulk, Jackson certainly looks the part of a starting left tackle in the NFL. He has an athletic frame that has room to pack on even more muscle. His long arms alone give him considerable range as a blocker, but his athletic ability aids that range even more so. Jackson is a smooth lateral mover who plays with promising quickness and great nimbleness in his feet when he moves. He has good counter agility and blocks with good body control.

Jackson accelerates well to the second level and takes good angles to defenders in down-blocking situations, giving him plenty of upside in zone schemes. He has flashed some potential in terms of his hand usage, as he can pack a powerful punch at the point of attack at times, and he has shown that he can play with quick hands when countering finesse moves.

Weaknesses

He has plenty of physical talents, but Jackson has quite a bit of work to do from a technical standpoint. His pad level needs some polishing, as he struggles with sinking his hips into contact and maintaining leverage consistently. He is guilty of lunging at times and can be knocked off balance fairly easily as a result of his own technical flaws.

Jackson doesn’t play with consistent hand placement yet and can get better at using his hands with more precision. They can also be a little bit quicker, as he can be a bit late to execute punches at times. He doesn’t have much of a nasty edge in his game yet, and he could be aided by adding a bit more power in his lower body to get better at driving defenders backwards.

Projection: 2nd Round

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2020 NFL draft: Prince Tega Wanogho scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Auburn offensive tackle prospect Prince Tega Wanogho

Prince Tega Wanogho | OT | Auburn

Elevator Pitch

A top-notch athlete for the offensive tackle position, Wanogho’s combination of size, body control and quickness makes him a prototypical developmental prospect for the offensive line. He has a ways to go from a technical perspective, but considering how far he’s come for a player with just one year of high school experience, the sky’s the limit for him if he gets coached up well in the NFL.

Vitals

Height | 6-5

Weight | 308

College Bio Page

Strengths

The athleticism that Wanogho brings to the table for a 6-foot-5 tackle at 300-plus pounds is nothing short of impressive.

It’s a shame Wanogho wasn’t able to partake in Combine drills, because he likely would have performed well enough to catapult himself into Round 1 conversation based off of his upside alone. He is a very good lateral athlete who moves with fantastic agility in pass protection. He has a spring in his step and can cover plenty of ground laterally, all while managing to not overset his motions. Wanogho accelerates to the second level very well and has the quickness to move well in zone and reach-blocking situations.

Wanogho has shown that he has plenty of flexibility when he knows what he’s doing, as his ankles and hips both possess the ability to move around easily. His footwork is surprisingly polished for someone as raw as he is. He made an impact quickly in his football career, as he has two seasons as a full-time starter to his name, as well as half of a season starting in 2017. That’s impressive considering he not only played one year of high school football, but the one year he did play he spent as a defensive end. Plus, even though it doesn’t affect his draft stock, Prince Tega is an actual prince, as his grandfather was the king of his village in Nigeria, which is pretty cool.

Weaknesses

When it comes down to it, Wanogho is, to put it lightly, a work in progress. Though he’s shown growth throughout his collegiate tenure, his technique is definitely still raw. His pad level isn’t all that great, as he can struggle to consistently stay low and create that leverage with his pads to generate power in his lower body. He doesn’t have a ton of lower-body strength yet, either, as he struggles against speed-to-power conversions and powerful defenders.

Wanogho’s hand usage could be cleaner up a bit, too. He doesn’t consistently get his hands inside of the shoulders of his opponents, and he is occasionally prone to allowing defenders inside of his frame. He doesn’t pack much of a punch at the point of attack, and though he plays with a solid overall motor, he could stand to develop a bit more nastiness in his game. He might be better off landing in a spot where he can redshirt his rookie year before entering the starting lineup.

Projection: 2nd Round

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2020 NFL draft: Josh Jones scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Houston offensive tackle prospect Josh Jones

Josh Jones | OT | Houston

Elevator Pitch

Jones is a bit of a work in progress, but the upside he brings to the table is palpable. He’s an athletic offensive tackle with great length, body control and lateral quickness in pass protection. He blocks with a high motor and has shown in flashes that he can physically overwhelm his opponents. If all goes well, he should be able to develop into a quality starter on the blindside.

Vitals

Height | 6-5

Weight | 319

College Bio Page

Strengths

Jones’ skill set offers plenty of potential to become a high-end starter in the league.

A lengthy offensive line prospect, Jones has very good height for his position and has the wingspan to possess good range as a blocker. He’s also a polished athlete with noticeable traits on film. He accelerates very well moving to the second level, and his lateral quickness in his kick slide in pass protection allows him to neutralize speed rushers on the outside. Jones is a flexible athlete who can change direction seamlessly and sink his hips with effectiveness, and he is capable of blocking defenders in down blocking situations.

He has also shown some flashes of improving technique over his time in Houston. Jones does a pretty good job of sealing off defenders and knocking edge rushers off their arc. His hand placement can be effective at times, and when he gets leverage with his pads, he wins his battles pretty consistently. He is also a determined player who can block with a nasty edge to his game on occasion. Plus, his four years of experience starting at the collegiate level should be appealing to teams.

Weaknesses

Jones’ flaws are for the most part fixable with good coaching, but those flaws could prevent him from being an immediate standout in the NFL. His hand placement and pad level need to be more consistent. He is susceptible to letting defenders inside of his frame from time to time, and though he has flexible hips, the ability to consistently sink them into contact isn’t quite developed yet.

Though a high quality pass protector, Jones could also get a little bit better against the run. His anchor strength, while improving, could still get a little better, and the jabs he unleashes at the point of attack aren’t always that powerful.

Projection: 1st Round

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2020 NFL draft: Jedrick Wills scouting report

Everything NFL draft fans need to know about Alabama offensive tackle prospect Jedrick Wills

Jedrick Wills | OT | Alabama

Elevator Pitch

A nasty, powerful blocker with ideal technique and intelligence for the offensive tackle position, Wills is a Day 1 starter who can make an immediate impact at either tackle spot. His well-rounded skill set and reliability as both a run blocker and a pass protector should have him drafted highly.

Vitals

Height | 6-4

Weight | 312

College Bio Page

Strengths

Wills does a lot of the important things right for an offensive tackle.

His technique is textbook, as he consistently blocks with his weight underneath him and manages to get leverage through his pad level on a regular basis. He does a great job of using his hands, timing his strikes well and generating plenty of power behind them. Wills’ hand placement is also among the best in this class: he regularly ends up getting them inside the shoulder pads of his opponents.

The footwork with which Wills plays in pass protection is ideal for his position. He has enough lateral quickness to keep up with quicker edge rushers, and he has very good body control in his shuffles. His motor also runs high on a down-by-down basis, showcasing the desire and ability to pummel defenders into the dirt. An intelligent zone blocker, he does a good job of executing his assignments and clearing lanes for his teammates by determining which defender to go after.

Weaknesses

There honestly aren’t a lot of weaknesses in Wills’ game.

Though solid in the athleticism department, his tape isn’t reflective of an elite athlete along the offensive line. His agility in the open field is decent, at best. He can be susceptible to stunts or moves to the inside when going up against athletic defenders.

Wills isn’t necessarily undersized, but his length for a tackle isn’t the best in the class. He has shorter arms for his position, and his height isn’t anything to call home about. That’s being rather nit-picky, as he should be more than capable of playing there in the pros, but it’s just a minor tick to an intriguing profile.

Projection: Top 10

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