Ohio State names Rosalind Joseph director of men’s and women’s track and field and cross country

It didn’t take long to name a former Buckeye as the new leader of the track and field program. #GoBucks

Just one day after announcing the retirement of the legendary Karen Dennis, Ohio State has a new leader of the track and field program. On Tuesday, the university named Rosalind Joseph the new director of men’s and women’s track and field and cross country.

Joseph, an alum of Ohio State, returns to Columbus following a four-year run at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale where she served as Director of Track & Field and Cross Country. While there, the Saluki women’s teams captured four runner-up finishes at the Missouri Valley Conference indoor and outdoor track and field championships while the men finished as high as third. A total of 10 Salukis earned All-America honors, seven women and three men.

“I am thrilled to introduce Rosalind Joseph as our new Director of Track & Field and Cross Country,” OSU athletic director Gene Smith said. “She has head coaching experience overseeing a dual men’s and women’s program at Southern Illinois, and now she is coming back home to Ohio State. She won six individual Big Ten championships as a Buckeye, graduated from Ohio State, and then coached here under Karen Dennis and helped us win six Big Ten team titles.”

Prior to her time at SIU, Joseph spent a decade coaching the Buckeyes. She served as an assistant coach under Dennis from 200 to 2012 before being promoted to an associate head coach position in 2013 and coaching through the 2017-18 season. She was named Great Lakes Region Men’s Assistant Coach of the Year before leaving for Southern Illinois.

“We are excited to welcome Rosalind back home to Columbus as our new Director of Track & Field and Cross Country,” Jamie Wood, the sport administrator for track & field and cross country, said in a statement. “In the wake of such a historic coaching run by Karen Dennis there was no doubt in our minds that Coach Joseph puts us in the best position to continue building on the foundation of success established through Karen’s years.”

“WOW – this is a dream come true,” Joseph said. “It is not often one gets to return to their alma mater to lead. Ohio State is a place that has given me so much as a student-athlete and as a young professional, so to come full circle as director is almost unbelievable. Thank you to Mr. Gene Smith and his administration for entrusting me with this role. These are BIG shoes to fill in following Karen Dennis, but so would be the case for anyone in the country. I feel poised and prepared to come back to my second home and take on the task of continuing the tradition of greatness with this historic program.”

What better way to make as seamless of a transition after Dennis’ retirement than bringing in a former Buckeye that’s worked under her and is familiar with the culture and winning ways of the program.

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Karen Dennis, Director of Ohio State men’s and women’s track and field, announces retirement

In case you missed it, Ohio State director of men’s and women’s track and field and cross country, Karen Dennis, announced her retirement.

It’s been a long, productive run for Ohio State director of men’s and women’s track and field and cross country, but it’s coming to an end. The university announced the retirement of Karen Dennis on Monday after 20 years at Ohio State.

Dennis came to OSU in 2002 as an assistant coach with the women’s track and field team and was elevated to women’s head coach in 2006. In 2014, she took on both the women’s and men’s track and field and cross country programs as the director.

During her time running the show, the Buckeyes took home 12 Big Ten championships including women’s indoor (2011, 2015, 2019, 2020) and outdoor (2011, 2012, 2019, 2021, 2022) crowns as well as men’s indoor and outdoor championships in 2018, their first in 25 years, and an outdoor title in 2022.

“I hope this isn’t too much of a surprise,” Dennis said in a statement. “I have coached for a long time and there are still things in life I’d like to do. I am truly thankful for this profession, and I want to express my gratitude to the many assistant coaches and support staff that have shared and sweated alongside me on this incredible journey. They share a primary role in the success of our programs.

“I also want to thank the hundreds of student-athletes who have shared their lives and careers as Buckeyes, and also their parents.

“I want to thank the great coaches here at Ohio State, and in the Big Ten Conference and nationally, who have served as examples of excellence and who have challenged and motivated me to be better.

“And, I want to thank my family for the sacrifices they made while I pursued coaching, and specifically my daughter Ebony, who shared with me and introduced me to 100s of kids through her work.”

To say that Dennis went out on top would be an understatement. She retires the same year that both the men’s and women’s track and field teams took home the outdoor Big Ten championship, the only time that’s happened in the program’s history.

“I can’t thank Karen Dennis enough for her friendship, her mentorship and the love she has for her student-athletes and Ohio State athletics,” Gene Smith, Senior Vice President and Wolfe Foundation Endowed Athletics Director, said. “I want to congratulate her on a truly legendary career in coaching. We have been incredibly fortunate to have her leading our programs.”

She will be missed.

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Ohio State’s Adelaide Aquilla breaks NCAA shot put record, defends national title

This is a very underrated result that should probably be more of a discussion point than what it will get. #GoBucks

Ohio State track and field star Adelaide Aquilla has done it again, this time in an even more impressive fashion. Aquilla won her second-straight NCAA title in the shot put by breaking the collegiate record with a throw of 19.64m.

Last year’s Olympic bronze medalist also had the top four throws in the entire competition to dominate the field and help place Ohio State No. 6 in the overall women’s NCAA championships after the first day of events. Aquilla beat the second-place finisher by more than a whole meter.

Perhaps even more impressive, Aquilla’s winning throw is the fourth-best in the entire world this year. In other words, the current Buckeye athlete is a star in the making on the world stage.

Keep an eye on the senior shot-putter as she no doubt begins to have more time to train even more intensely after college and perhaps make a run at some pretty special things in the next Olympic Games in Paris in 2024.

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Notre Dame’s Dylan Jacobs is national champion in 10,000 meters

Big moment for the Irish track team.

The national track and field championships have arrived, and Notre Dame already is bringing home some hardware. More specifically, senior distance runner [autotag]Dylan Jacobs[/autotag] is bringing it home. On the first day of the championships in Eugene, Oregon, Jacobs won the 10,000-meter championship in 28 minutes, 12.32 seconds. He’s the second athlete in program history to win the national championship in that event, and he understandably was thrilled:

Jacobs was one of four Irish representatives in the 10,000. Junior [autotag]Matthew Carmody[/autotag] set a personal best with a time of 28:34.28 while placing 16th. Sophomore [autotag]Joshua Methner[/autotag] was 21st in 28:57.31, and senior [autotag]Andrew Alexander[/autotag] finished last in the field at 24th in 29:09.02.

Jacobs also will compete in the 5,000 final later in the week. He’s one of only two Notre Dame athletes who will compete in two events during the championships. The other is [autotag]Tom Seitzer[/autotag], who is set to take part in the 3,000 and steeplechase.

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NCAA Outdoor Championships, Track & Field, live stream, TV channel, schedule, how to watch

The 2022 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships will get underway on Wednesday night from the Hayward Field at the University of Oregon.

The 2022 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships will get underway on Wednesday night from the Hayward Field at the University of Oregon. The Men’s Competitions will kick off the four-day event tonight followed by the Women’s Competitions on Thursday.

NCAA Outdoor Championships, Track & Field

  • When: Wednesday, June 8
  • Time: 7:30 p.m. ET
  • TV: ESPN2
  • Live Stream: fuboTV (watch for free)

2022 NCAA Track & Field Schedule

  • Wednesday, June 8: Men’s Day 1, 7:30 p.m.
  • Thursday, June 9: Women’s Day 1, 8:30 p.m.
  • Friday, June 10: 6/10 Men’s Day 2, 9 p.m.
  • Saturday, June 11: 6/11 Women’s Day 2, 5:30 p.m.

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Jesse Owens a part of the inaugural Collegiate Athlete Hall of Fame class

Jesse Owens may have had the most impressive 45-minutes any collegiate athlete experienced in 1935. #GoBucks

An Ohio State legend is a part of the inaugural class of the Collegiate Athlete Hall of Fame according to a release on Tuesday. The U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches’ Association (USTFCCCA) held its first-ever induction ceremony in Eugene, Oregon, on Monday night, and the “Buckeye Bullet,” Jesse Owens, was a part of 30 individuals enshrined.

Owens really needs no introduction, but he competed at the varsity level for the Ohio State track and field team in 1935 and 1936, when he won four individual NCAA championships in back-to-back years, the first and only athlete to do so, even to this day. The eight individual championships are also still a record despite Owens only competing for two years.

The track legend had one of the greatest feats any athlete has ever experienced when he won four events at the Big Ten Championships in a span of just 45 minutes on May 25, 1935. His efforts on that day resulted in five world records and the tying of a sixth.

That was all before he stuck it to Hitler at the Olympic Games in Berlin in 1936 where he won four gold medals in the 100m, 200m, long jump, and 4x100m relay world record-setting team.

To be eligible for the first-ever class, athletes had to be men who had completed their collegiate eligibility prior to 2000 and women prior to 2010.

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Ohio State men and women both win Big Ten outdoor track and field championships

Both the men’s and women’s track teams brought home the Big Ten outdoor title Sunday. #GoBucks

It’s been a great day at the Big Ten outdoor championships for both the men’s and women’s track teams. That’s because they swept the event on Sunday in Minneapolis, the first time a school has swept the event since Wisconsin did it in 1997.

The men outpaced second-place Iowa by scoring 124 points to the Hawkeyes’ 103 points to take the title. Wisconsin finished in third place with 90 points, while Nebraska (82) and Minnesota (73) rounded out the top five.

On the women’s side, the Buckeyes were dominant, breaking the record point output set by Michigan (179 points) back in 1994 by racking up 185.5 points. Wisconsin finished in second place with 98 points, while Minnesota (87), Penn State (82.5), and Nebraska (71) rounded out the top five.

It was the fifth title overall and second-straight for the women’s program, and sixth for the men.

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Devon Allen lays out plans for return to NFL while competing in Track & Field World Championships

What’s next for Devon Allen? “Get ready for worlds, win, break the world record. Do that whole thing.” Then the former Duck hopes NFL training camp follows.

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It must be nice to get the notion that you want to return to the world of football and try to land a job in the NFL, and have people take you seriously, right?

For Devon Allen, an Olympic sprinter who was also a highly-successful wide receiver for the Oregon Ducks several years ago, that’s where things are at the moment. With a couple of trips to the Olympics under his belt, Allen has made the decision that he wants to return to the game of football and try to find a spot on an NFL roster this upcoming season.

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To help get this ‘track to turf’ campaign off of the ground, Allen participated in the Ducks’ Pro Day on Friday to announce that he is serious about switching sports and throw his hat in the ring for a roster spot this fall.

“That was kind of always the plan,” Allen said after the Pro Day. “When I had my last knee injury, which was in the 2016-2017 season, I decided I was going to focus on track through the next Olympics, and that actually took a year longer than I had planned because of COVID. But, you know, now we’re here.”

While a knee injury ended his football career at Oregon, Allen has been wildly successful on the track, winning gold in the 110m hurdles in the 2018 USA Outdoor Championships, and representing Team USA in both the 2016 and 2020 Olympic Games.

Though this isn’t an Olympic year, there is still a chance for Allen to compete at the top of the mountain in the world of track and field and do so right on his home turf of Hayward Field. The IAAF World Championships are coming to Eugene this summer, with the best athletes in the world competing at the top of their fields. For Allen, an eventual return to football isn’t going to stop him from taking part in all of the fun.

“The goal is to… I’m pretty much going to put football on the back burner for now,” Allen said. “I just wanted to come to the Pro Day and announce that I’m taking this seriously. The goal is to get ready for worlds, win, break a world record, and do that whole thing. On July 18th, when Worlds is done, go to camp that next week. That’s kind of the goal I envisioned in my head to make it work, and I feel like that is quite possible.”

It may seem like a nonchalant view of the NFL world, with a sprinter assuming that he can trade in his spikes for a pair of cleats and start to play the nation’s most popular game with the best of the best. However, with his elite speed and past history on the gridiron, Allen certainly has a chance. In his three seasons with the Ducks, Allen had almost 1,000 yards receiving and 8 touchdowns, and he always stood as the most explosive player on the field.

If NFL scouts and GMs were watching on Friday, they likely saw an athletic player who could beat anyone in a foot race while holding a great background in the sport.

It’s safe to say there’s a lot there to work with.

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Big news for Clemson athletes

The Clemson University Athletic Department and IPTAY value the academic pursuit and achievements of student-athletes. In recognition of this commitment, Clemson and IPTAY have established the Clemson Academic Performance or “CAP” award. Through this …

The Clemson University Athletic Department and IPTAY value the academic pursuit and achievements of student-athletes. In recognition of this commitment, Clemson and IPTAY have established the Clemson Academic Performance or “CAP” award. Through this plan, Clemson student-athletes have the opportunity to earn rewards for their continued achievement in the classroom and progress toward graduation.

A recent Supreme Court ruling in Alston vs. the NCAA case paved the way for student-athletes to receive up to $5,980 per academic year to reward academic progress. The financial awards are on top of the support currently offered by Clemson, such as laptop computers and other educational supplies.

“Our student-athletes compete at the highest levels on and off the field while setting their sights on graduation,” said Director of Athletics Graham Neff. “I am delighted that our student-athletes are now able to earn rewards for academic success at one of the top universities in the nation, and am grateful to IPTAY and our donors for making this possible. Our foundation is built upon the importance of academic success, and this is another way of ensuring we can continue to grow and reward the great work of our students.”

Department-wide, Clemson’s student-athletes have achieved at nearly unprecedented levels in recent years. Clemson’s most recent graduation success rate (GSR) of 95 percent was a program record, the department GPA has finished above 3.0 for seven consecutive semesters, and Clemson routinely earns high marks in Academic Progress.

Beginning in Spring 2022, Clemson’s approximately 450 student-athletes who receive athletic aid will be eligible for the benefit. The CAP will be based on the successful completion of the NCAA’s APR calculation each term – university retention and NCAA eligibility, and the student-athlete must maintain good standing with the University and may not be on disciplinary probation.

–Courtesy of Clemson Athletic Communications

Clemson Variety & Frame is doing their part to help bring you some classic new barware and help one of the local businesses that helps make Clemson special.

Order your Nick’s barware and do your part to help.  #SaveNicks

Texas WR Isaiah Neyor has transfer rating raised

The anticipation to see Isaiah Neyor in a Texas uniform continues to build.

The anticipation to see Isaiah Neyor in a Texas uniform continues to build.

The Wyoming transfer was already viewed as one of the better transfers available in the portal this offseason, but 247Sports took the liberty of boosting his rating even higher.

The article mentions that advanced data, film, and what they have been hearing from camp all played a factor.

Here is what they said about the playmaker from Arlington:

Big-play threat Isaiah Neyor was one of the most coveted transfer portal receivers this cycle. Neyor originally committed to Tennessee and then flipped to Texas. Neyor averaged a whopping 20 yards per catch in 2021 for Wyoming and had nice overall production, with 44 catches for 878 yards and 12 touchdowns. He showed the ability to consistently get over the top and has the size to make contested catches downfield.

Intel out of Austin has been great so far regarding Neyor and hopes are high that he can be the much-needed No. 2 complement to star Xavier Worthy (as defenses key on Worthy, Neyor should be freed up). With big-armed Quinn Ewers the favorite to start at quarterback, Texas shouldn’t have an issue getting Neyor the ball deep.

His ranking went from a 91, which was in the 29-40 range, to a 93. This bumps him up to the No. 18 spot, which has him as the third highest ranked receiving transfer.

Neyor exploded onto the scene in 2021, grabbing 44 catches for 878 yards, averaging 20 yards per catch, and hauled in 12 touchdowns. He put up all these numbers in an offense at Wyoming that ranked No. 117 in passing offense in the country.

Whether it is Ewers or Hudson Card behind center, the Longhorns quarterback will have an embarrassment of riches in 2022 when it comes to receiver weapons.