Pound for pound: Shakur Stevenson continues ascent after another strong performance

Pound for pound: Shakur Stevenson continues his ascent after another strong performance against Robson Conceicao on Friday.

Shakur Stevenson shows no signs of slowing down.

The gifted now-135-pounder dominated another good fighter on Friday in Newark, New Jersey, easily outpointing 2016 Olympic champion Robson Conceicao after losing his 130-pound titles on the scale the day before.

The victory wasn’t as monumental as his impressive triumphs over former titleholders Jamel Herring and Oscar Valdez, who were more respected than Conceicao before meeting Stevenson. For example, the Brazilian also lost a wide decision to Valdez.

Thus, Stevenson won’t crack the Top 10 on Boxing Junkie’s pound-for-pound list based on this performance

At the same time, another dazzling performance against a legitimate contender merits recognition. With that in mind, he moves up two notches, from No. 14 to No. 12.

That pushes Artur Beterbiev and Jermall Charlo — previously Nos. 12 and 13 — down one spot each. Gervonta Davis, a potential opponent for Stevenson, is No. 11.

Here’s what the list looks like at the moment:

BOXING JUNKIE
POUND-FOR-POUND

  1. Terence Crawford – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Errol Spence Jr. for the undisputed welterweight championship on Nov. 19 in Las Vegas but no official announcement has been made.
  2. Naoya Inoue – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Paul Butler for the undisputed bantamweight championship on Dec. 13 in Japan but no official announcement has been made.
  3. Oleksandr Usyk – No fight scheduled.
  4. Errol Spence Jr. – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Terence Crawford for the undisputed welterweight championship on Nov. 19 in Las Vegas but no official announcement has been made.
  5. Tyson Fury – Reportedly has reached an agreement to defend his WBC heavyweight title against Anthony Joshua on Dec. 3 but no official announcement has been made.
  6. Dmitry Bivol – Scheduled to defend his WBA light heavyweight title against Gilberto Ramirez on Nov. 5 in the United Arab Emirates.
  7. Canelo Alvarez– No fight scheduled.
  8. Vasiliy Lomachenko – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Jamaine Ortiz on Oct. 29 in New  York but no official announcement has been made.
  9. Juan Francisco Estrada – Scheduled to face Roman Gonzalez on Dec. 3. Estrada is the WBC’s junior bantamweight “franchise champion”.
  10. Jermell Charlo – Reportedly has reached an agreement to defend his undisputed junior middleweight championship against Tim Tszyu on Jan. 28 but no official announcement has been made.
  11. Gervonta Davis – No fight scheduled.
  12. Artur Beterbiev – Had been scheduled to defend his unified titles against Anthony Yarde on Oct. 29. However, the fight was postponed after Beterbiev was injured. No new date has been announced.
  13. Jermall Charlo – No fights scheduled.
  14. Shakur Stevenson No fight scheduled.
  15. Roman Gonzalez Scheduled to face WBC junior bantamweight “franchise champion” Juan Francisco Estrada on Dec. 3.

Honorable mention (alphabetical order): David Benavidez (no fight scheduled); Stephen Fulton Jr. (no fight scheduled); Devin Haney (scheduled to defend his undisputed lightweight championship in a rematch with George Kambosos Jr. on Oct. 16 in Australia); Kazuto Ioka (no fight scheduled); Josh Taylor (reportedly in talks to defend his WBO junior welterweight title in a rematch with Jack Catterall in January but no deal is in place).

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Pound for pound: Shakur Stevenson continues ascent after another strong performance

Pound for pound: Shakur Stevenson continues his ascent after another strong performance against Robson Conceicao on Friday.

Shakur Stevenson shows no signs of slowing down.

The gifted now-135-pounder dominated another good fighter on Friday in Newark, New Jersey, easily outpointing 2016 Olympic champion Robson Conceicao after losing his 130-pound titles on the scale the day before.

The victory wasn’t as monumental as his impressive triumphs over former titleholders Jamel Herring and Oscar Valdez, who were more respected than Conceicao before meeting Stevenson. For example, the Brazilian also lost a wide decision to Valdez.

Thus, Stevenson won’t crack the Top 10 on Boxing Junkie’s pound-for-pound list based on this performance

At the same time, another dazzling performance against a legitimate contender merits recognition. With that in mind, he moves up two notches, from No. 14 to No. 12.

That pushes Artur Beterbiev and Jermall Charlo — previously Nos. 12 and 13 — down one spot each. Gervonta Davis, a potential opponent for Stevenson, is No. 11.

Here’s what the list looks like at the moment:

BOXING JUNKIE
POUND-FOR-POUND

  1. Terence Crawford – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Errol Spence Jr. for the undisputed welterweight championship on Nov. 19 in Las Vegas but no official announcement has been made.
  2. Naoya Inoue – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Paul Butler for the undisputed bantamweight championship on Dec. 13 in Japan but no official announcement has been made.
  3. Oleksandr Usyk – No fight scheduled.
  4. Errol Spence Jr. – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Terence Crawford for the undisputed welterweight championship on Nov. 19 in Las Vegas but no official announcement has been made.
  5. Tyson Fury – Reportedly has reached an agreement to defend his WBC heavyweight title against Anthony Joshua on Dec. 3 but no official announcement has been made.
  6. Dmitry Bivol – Scheduled to defend his WBA light heavyweight title against Gilberto Ramirez on Nov. 5 in the United Arab Emirates.
  7. Canelo Alvarez– No fight scheduled.
  8. Vasiliy Lomachenko – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Jamaine Ortiz on Oct. 29 in New  York but no official announcement has been made.
  9. Juan Francisco Estrada – Scheduled to face Roman Gonzalez on Dec. 3. Estrada is the WBC’s junior bantamweight “franchise champion”.
  10. Jermell Charlo – Reportedly has reached an agreement to defend his undisputed junior middleweight championship against Tim Tszyu on Jan. 28 but no official announcement has been made.
  11. Gervonta Davis – No fight scheduled.
  12. Artur Beterbiev – Had been scheduled to defend his unified titles against Anthony Yarde on Oct. 29. However, the fight was postponed after Beterbiev was injured. No new date has been announced.
  13. Jermall Charlo – No fights scheduled.
  14. Shakur Stevenson No fight scheduled.
  15. Roman Gonzalez Scheduled to face WBC junior bantamweight “franchise champion” Juan Francisco Estrada on Dec. 3.

Honorable mention (alphabetical order): David Benavidez (no fight scheduled); Stephen Fulton Jr. (no fight scheduled); Devin Haney (scheduled to defend his undisputed lightweight championship in a rematch with George Kambosos Jr. on Oct. 16 in Australia); Kazuto Ioka (no fight scheduled); Josh Taylor (reportedly in talks to defend his WBO junior welterweight title in a rematch with Jack Catterall in January but no deal is in place).

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Pound for pound: Gennadiy Golovkin drops out after long, illustrious run

Pound for pound: Gennadiy Golovkin drops off Boxing Junkie’s list after a long, illustrious run near the top.

Gennadiy Golovkin, 40, is no longer one of the best.

That was abundantly clear on Saturday in Las Vegas, where he looked his age in a unanimous-decision loss to super middleweight champion Canelo Alvarez in their third fight.

He did next to nothing for two thirds of the fight but showed some signs of life down the stretch, which might’ve saved him from embarrassment.

However, overall, the Triple-G we saw at T-Mobile Arena had no resemblance to the beast who ran roughshod over a long list of solid middleweight opponents for a decade-plus. That fighter is gone.

Thus, Golovkin (unlucky No. 13 in the most recent rankings) drops off of Boxing Junkie’s pound-for-pound list.

That allows Jermall Charlo and Shakur Stevenson to move up one notch each from Nos. 14 and 15, respectively. And Roman Gonzalez ascends from Honorable Mention to No. 15.

Golovkin is replaced on the list by veteran Kazuto Ioka, who re-enters as an Honorable Mention. The Japanese junior bantamweight titleholder last fought in July, when he easily outpointed Donnie Nietes to avenge an earlier split-decision loss.

Meanwhile, Alvarez (No. 7) got back into the win column after his upset loss to Dmitry Bivol in May. However, a victory over this version of Golovkin wasn’t enough for him to climb the list. He stays put.

Stevenson, who is on the rise, is scheduled to defend his 130-pound titles against Robson Conceicao on Friday in Newark, New Jersey.

Here is what the list looks like at the moment:

BOXING JUNKIE
POUND-FOR-POUND

  1. Terence Crawford – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Errol Spence Jr. for the undisputed welterweight championship on Nov. 19 in Las Vegas but no official announcement has been made.
  2. Naoya Inoue – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Paul Butler for the undisputed bantamweight championship on Dec. 13 in Japan but no official announcement has been made.
  3. Oleksandr Usyk – No fight scheduled.
  4. Errol Spence Jr. – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Terence Crawford for the undisputed welterweight championship on Nov. 19 in Las Vegas but no official announcement has been made.
  5. Tyson Fury – Reportedly has reached an agreement to defend his WBC heavyweight title against Anthony Joshua on Dec. 3 but no official announcement has been made.
  6. Dmitry Bivol – Scheduled to defend his WBA light heavyweight title against Gilberto Ramirez on Nov. 5 in the United Arab Emirates.
  7. Canelo Alvarez– No fight scheduled.
  8. Vasiliy Lomachenko – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Jamaine Ortiz on Oct. 29 in New  York but no official announcement has been made.
  9. Juan Francisco Estrada – Scheduled to face Roman Gonzalez on Dec. 3. Estrada is the WBC’s junior bantamweight “franchise champion”.
  10. Jermell Charlo – Reportedly has reached an agreement to defend his undisputed junior middleweight championship against Tim Tszyu on Jan. 28 but no official announcement has been made.
  11. Gervonta Davis – No fight scheduled.
  12. Artur Beterbiev – Had been scheduled to defend his unified titles against Anthony Yarde on Oct. 29. However, the fight was postponed after Beterbiev was injured. No new date has been announced.
  13. Jermall Charlo – No fights scheduled.
  14. Shakur Stevenson Scheduled to defend his unified junior lightweight titles against Robson Conceicao on Sept. 23 in Newark, N.J.
  15. Roman Gonzalez Scheduled to face WBC junior bantamweight “franchise champion” Juan Francisco Estrada on Dec. 3.

Honorable mention (alphabetical order): David Benavidez (no fight scheduled); Stephen Fulton Jr. (no fight scheduled); Devin Haney (scheduled to defend his undisputed lightweight championship in a rematch with George Kambosos Jr. on Oct. 16 in Australia); Kazuto Ioka (no fight scheduled); Josh Taylor (reportedly in talks to defend his WBO junior welterweight title in a rematch with Jack Catterall in January but no deal is in place).

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Pound for pound: Gennadiy Golovkin drops out after long, illustrious run

Pound for pound: Gennadiy Golovkin drops off Boxing Junkie’s list after a long, illustrious run near the top.

Gennadiy Golovkin, 40, is no longer one of the best.

That was abundantly clear on Saturday in Las Vegas, where he looked his age in a unanimous-decision loss to super middleweight champion Canelo Alvarez in their third fight.

He did next to nothing for two thirds of the fight but showed some signs of life down the stretch, which might’ve saved him from embarrassment.

However, overall, the Triple-G we saw at T-Mobile Arena had no resemblance to the beast who ran roughshod over a long list of solid middleweight opponents for a decade-plus. That fighter is gone.

Thus, Golovkin (unlucky No. 13 in the most recent rankings) drops off of Boxing Junkie’s pound-for-pound list.

That allows Jermall Charlo and Shakur Stevenson to move up one notch each from Nos. 14 and 15, respectively. And Roman Gonzalez ascends from Honorable Mention to No. 15.

Golovkin is replaced on the list by veteran Kazuto Ioka, who re-enters as an Honorable Mention. The Japanese junior bantamweight titleholder last fought in July, when he easily outpointed Donnie Nietes to avenge an earlier split-decision loss.

Meanwhile, Alvarez (No. 7) got back into the win column after his upset loss to Dmitry Bivol in May. However, a victory over this version of Golovkin wasn’t enough for him to climb the list. He stays put.

Stevenson, who is on the rise, is scheduled to defend his 130-pound titles against Robson Conceicao on Friday in Newark, New Jersey.

Here is what the list looks like at the moment:

BOXING JUNKIE
POUND-FOR-POUND

  1. Terence Crawford – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Errol Spence Jr. for the undisputed welterweight championship on Nov. 19 in Las Vegas but no official announcement has been made.
  2. Naoya Inoue – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Paul Butler for the undisputed bantamweight championship on Dec. 13 in Japan but no official announcement has been made.
  3. Oleksandr Usyk – No fight scheduled.
  4. Errol Spence Jr. – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Terence Crawford for the undisputed welterweight championship on Nov. 19 in Las Vegas but no official announcement has been made.
  5. Tyson Fury – Reportedly has reached an agreement to defend his WBC heavyweight title against Anthony Joshua on Dec. 3 but no official announcement has been made.
  6. Dmitry Bivol – Scheduled to defend his WBA light heavyweight title against Gilberto Ramirez on Nov. 5 in the United Arab Emirates.
  7. Canelo Alvarez– No fight scheduled.
  8. Vasiliy Lomachenko – Reportedly has reached an agreement to meet Jamaine Ortiz on Oct. 29 in New  York but no official announcement has been made.
  9. Juan Francisco Estrada – Scheduled to face Roman Gonzalez on Dec. 3. Estrada is the WBC’s junior bantamweight “franchise champion”.
  10. Jermell Charlo – Reportedly has reached an agreement to defend his undisputed junior middleweight championship against Tim Tszyu on Jan. 28 but no official announcement has been made.
  11. Gervonta Davis – No fight scheduled.
  12. Artur Beterbiev – Had been scheduled to defend his unified titles against Anthony Yarde on Oct. 29. However, the fight was postponed after Beterbiev was injured. No new date has been announced.
  13. Jermall Charlo – No fights scheduled.
  14. Shakur Stevenson Scheduled to defend his unified junior lightweight titles against Robson Conceicao on Sept. 23 in Newark, N.J.
  15. Roman Gonzalez Scheduled to face WBC junior bantamweight “franchise champion” Juan Francisco Estrada on Dec. 3.

Honorable mention (alphabetical order): David Benavidez (no fight scheduled); Stephen Fulton Jr. (no fight scheduled); Devin Haney (scheduled to defend his undisputed lightweight championship in a rematch with George Kambosos Jr. on Oct. 16 in Australia); Kazuto Ioka (no fight scheduled); Josh Taylor (reportedly in talks to defend his WBO junior welterweight title in a rematch with Jack Catterall in January but no deal is in place).

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Good, bad, worse: Canelo Alvarez, Gennadiy Golovkin served up stinker

A critical look at the past week in boxing GOOD The “good” that came out of the third fight between Canelo Alvarez and Gennadiy Golovkin on Saturday is that it’s over. The 40-year-old Triple-G looked his age for two thirds of the bout and 39 in the …

A critical look at the past week in boxing

GOOD

The “good” that came out of the third fight between Canelo Alvarez and Gennadiy Golovkin on Saturday is that it’s over.

The 40-year-old Triple-G looked his age for two thirds of the bout and 39 in the last third. Alvarez faded down the stretch of a fight he never really wanted, complaining afterward that he aggravated a painful wrist injury that will require surgery.

The result was painful to watch.

The first seven, eight rounds weren’t remotely competitive, as Alvarez pushed the action and the plodding Golovkin focused on avoiding punishment rather than dishing any of it out. He threw almost nothing but inaccurate jabs.

It was as if Golovkin – who had pushed his rival to his limits in their two previous fights – didn’t belong in the ring with him at this stage of the game.

A clearly frustrated Johnathan Banks, Golovkin’s trainer, said in a ringside interview during Round 8 that his man needed to get to work. The fact is he didn’t show up for work for most of the fight.

Triple-G began to fight back in the eighth or ninth round, which made the fight competitive from then on. He claimed that the late start was his strategy, perhaps because he no longer has the stamina to fight hard for 12 rounds.

That effort didn’t save Golovkin or the fight.

The rally (if that’s what it was) was too little, too late, as he lost a unanimous decision by scores — 116-112, 115-113 and 115-113 — that were this ridiculously generous to the loser. (See “worse” below.)

And a few competitive rounds don’t transform a horrible fight into a good one, unless you like watching a shell of a once-great fighter face an injured opponent who didn’t seem the least bit inspired.

The first two fights between Alvarez and Golovkin were good fights. The third couldn’t have been more forgettable.

 

BAD

What’s next for Alvarez and Golovkin?

Alvarez said he wants to give his body time to heal, including what he said would be a surgically repaired wrist. Then he will pursue a rematch Dmitry Bivol, assuming the Russian defeats Gilberto Ramirez in November.

“And I’ll beat him,” Alvarez said after the fight Saturday.

I don’t think so.

Bivol’s unanimous-decision victory over Alvarez in May was convincing. He was the bigger, much better fighter that night. And I saw nothing in Alvarez’s third fight with Golovkin that leads me to believe he could overcome Bivol in a rematch, although I’ll take his word on the injury.

I get the desire for a rematch. Pride. However, I think Alvarez would be wiser to face opponents smaller than Bivol, guys like David Benavidez and Jermall Charlo. Those fights would be more winnable for Alvarez and better received by the fans.

Who wouldn’t want to see Alvarez vs. Benavidez? That’s the most exciting potential matchup for the Mexican.

Alvarez will have plenty of time to consider his options. I’m hoping he puts his pride aside and goes in a fan-friendly direction.

Golovkin?

He made it clear after the fight that he plans to move back down to 160 to defend his middleweight titles, which makes me uncomfortable.

He might still be able to beat the likes of Kamil Szeremeta and Ryota Murata, his victims in his previous two fights. But can you imagine him fighting Demetrius Andrade or Jermall Charlo? I don’t want to think about that.

The Gennadiy Golovkin who once destroyed everyone in his path is gone. Maybe it’s time to move on.

 

WORSE

FightNews.com

I could ask this question about all too many fights that go the distance: What were the judges watching?

I gave Golovkin one of the 12 rounds. I can see giving him two, maybe even three if you gave him the benefit of every doubt. But five?

That’s what judges Steve Weisfeld and David Sutherland saw. They both gave Golovkin the first round and four of the last five. Judge Dave Moretti gave the loser four rounds, all coming in the final seven.

I acknowledge that Golovkin was more competitive in the final third of the fight but he was still inaccurate with his shots – mostly jabs – in those rounds. He was better but not particularly effective.

Alvarez didn’t have his best stretch, either. However, I thought he continued to land the more eye-catching shots.

Consider this: Had judges Weisfeld and Sutherland given Golovkin just one more round, a one-sided, not-really-competitive fight would’ve been a majority draw. Imagine the uproar had that occurred.

The bottom line for me? The official scoring had to be jarring for disappointed fans because they saw what they saw, a fight dominated by Alvarez that should’ve been scored as such. They know the scoring didn’t reflect what happened in the ring.

It was as if the judges bent over backward to justify a bad matchup. That’s not their job.

 

RABBIT PUNCHES

News item No. 1: Terence Crawford (38-0, 29 KOs) and Errol Spence Jr. (28-0, 22 KOs) have agreed to terms for a welterweight showdown on Nov. 19, although no one has signed anything. That’s the best possible matchup in boxing, reminiscent of great 147-pound matchups of the past. I wish Crawford (34) were a little younger but I’m not complaining. I hope it happens. … News item No. 2: Tyson Fury and Anthony Joshua apparently will meet on Dec. 3. It’s a strange matchup given Joshua’s back-to-back losses to Oleksandr Usyk, which has damaged his legacy. Why not fight Usyk for the undisputed heavyweight championship? Because an all-British matchup between Fury and Joshua is bigger than Fury-Usyk in terms of business, certainly in the U.K. It might be the most lucrative fight in the history of that country in spite of Joshua’s obvious vulnerabilities. I get it. Fury can fight Usyk later. Who wins the aforementioned fights? I now lean toward Crawford in a close fight with Spence because he’s the better, more dynamic all-around boxer. And no active heavyweight can beat a focused, fit Fury. …

Boxing can be funny. Junior bantamweight titleholder Bam Rodiguez (17-0, 11 KOs) destroyed Carlos Cuadras and Srisaket Sor Rungvisai and then struggled on the Alvarez-Golovkin card against an opponent he was expected to handle easily, four-time title challenger Israel Gonzalez (28-5-1, 11 KOs). Rodriguez deserved the unanimous-decision victory but he had to work hard for it. Why? Give Gonzalez credit. The 25-year-old Mexican is a good, experienced fighter. And Rodriguez probably suffered somewhat of a let down after his life-changing victories earlier in the year. The 22-year-old from San Antonio deserves credit for getting the job done. And, of course, he remains a Fighter of the Year candidate. … Super middleweight contender Ali Akhmedov (19-1, 14 KOs) looked terrific in his shutout-decision victory over veteran Gabriel Rosado (26-16-1, 15 KOs) on the Alvarez-Golovkin card. Golovkin’s stable mate outboxed and outworked Rosado, who was never given a chance to get anything done. I’ll always wonder about Akhmedov’s chin light of his knockout loss to Carlos Gongora in 2020 but he clearly can fight. Rosado, 36, has now lost his last three fights. The end for the scrappy Philadelphia fighter is near.

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Good, bad, worse: Canelo Alvarez, Gennadiy Golovkin served up stinker

A critical look at the past week in boxing GOOD The “good” that came out of the third fight between Canelo Alvarez and Gennadiy Golovkin on Saturday is that it’s over. The 40-year-old Triple-G looked his age for two thirds of the bout and 39 in the …

A critical look at the past week in boxing

GOOD

The “good” that came out of the third fight between Canelo Alvarez and Gennadiy Golovkin on Saturday is that it’s over.

The 40-year-old Triple-G looked his age for two thirds of the bout and 39 in the last third. Alvarez faded down the stretch of a fight he never really wanted, complaining afterward that he aggravated a painful wrist injury that will require surgery.

The result was painful to watch.

The first seven, eight rounds weren’t remotely competitive, as Alvarez pushed the action and the plodding Golovkin focused on avoiding punishment rather than dishing any of it out. He threw almost nothing but inaccurate jabs.

It was as if Golovkin – who had pushed his rival to his limits in their two previous fights – didn’t belong in the ring with him at this stage of the game.

A clearly frustrated Johnathan Banks, Golovkin’s trainer, said in a ringside interview during Round 8 that his man needed to get to work. The fact is he didn’t show up for work for most of the fight.

Triple-G began to fight back in the eighth or ninth round, which made the fight competitive from then on. He claimed that the late start was his strategy, perhaps because he no longer has the stamina to fight hard for 12 rounds.

That effort didn’t save Golovkin or the fight.

The rally (if that’s what it was) was too little, too late, as he lost a unanimous decision by scores — 116-112, 115-113 and 115-113 — that were this ridiculously generous to the loser. (See “worse” below.)

And a few competitive rounds don’t transform a horrible fight into a good one, unless you like watching a shell of a once-great fighter face an injured opponent who didn’t seem the least bit inspired.

The first two fights between Alvarez and Golovkin were good fights. The third couldn’t have been more forgettable.

 

BAD

What’s next for Alvarez and Golovkin?

Alvarez said he wants to give his body time to heal, including what he said would be a surgically repaired wrist. Then he will pursue a rematch Dmitry Bivol, assuming the Russian defeats Gilberto Ramirez in November.

“And I’ll beat him,” Alvarez said after the fight Saturday.

I don’t think so.

Bivol’s unanimous-decision victory over Alvarez in May was convincing. He was the bigger, much better fighter that night. And I saw nothing in Alvarez’s third fight with Golovkin that leads me to believe he could overcome Bivol in a rematch, although I’ll take his word on the injury.

I get the desire for a rematch. Pride. However, I think Alvarez would be wiser to face opponents smaller than Bivol, guys like David Benavidez and Jermall Charlo. Those fights would be more winnable for Alvarez and better received by the fans.

Who wouldn’t want to see Alvarez vs. Benavidez? That’s the most exciting potential matchup for the Mexican.

Alvarez will have plenty of time to consider his options. I’m hoping he puts his pride aside and goes in a fan-friendly direction.

Golovkin?

He made it clear after the fight that he plans to move back down to 160 to defend his middleweight titles, which makes me uncomfortable.

He might still be able to beat the likes of Kamil Szeremeta and Ryota Murata, his victims in his previous two fights. But can you imagine him fighting Demetrius Andrade or Jermall Charlo? I don’t want to think about that.

The Gennadiy Golovkin who once destroyed everyone in his path is gone. Maybe it’s time to move on.

 

WORSE

FightNews.com

I could ask this question about all too many fights that go the distance: What were the judges watching?

I gave Golovkin one of the 12 rounds. I can see giving him two, maybe even three if you gave him the benefit of every doubt. But five?

That’s what judges Steve Weisfeld and David Sutherland saw. They both gave Golovkin the first round and four of the last five. Judge Dave Moretti gave the loser four rounds, all coming in the final seven.

I acknowledge that Golovkin was more competitive in the final third of the fight but he was still inaccurate with his shots – mostly jabs – in those rounds. He was better but not particularly effective.

Alvarez didn’t have his best stretch, either. However, I thought he continued to land the more eye-catching shots.

Consider this: Had judges Weisfeld and Sutherland given Golovkin just one more round, a one-sided, not-really-competitive fight would’ve been a majority draw. Imagine the uproar had that occurred.

The bottom line for me? The official scoring had to be jarring for disappointed fans because they saw what they saw, a fight dominated by Alvarez that should’ve been scored as such. They know the scoring didn’t reflect what happened in the ring.

It was as if the judges bent over backward to justify a bad matchup. That’s not their job.

 

RABBIT PUNCHES

News item No. 1: Terence Crawford (38-0, 29 KOs) and Errol Spence Jr. (28-0, 22 KOs) have agreed to terms for a welterweight showdown on Nov. 19, although no one has signed anything. That’s the best possible matchup in boxing, reminiscent of great 147-pound matchups of the past. I wish Crawford (34) were a little younger but I’m not complaining. I hope it happens. … News item No. 2: Tyson Fury and Anthony Joshua apparently will meet on Dec. 3. It’s a strange matchup given Joshua’s back-to-back losses to Oleksandr Usyk, which has damaged his legacy. Why not fight Usyk for the undisputed heavyweight championship? Because an all-British matchup between Fury and Joshua is bigger than Fury-Usyk in terms of business, certainly in the U.K. It might be the most lucrative fight in the history of that country in spite of Joshua’s obvious vulnerabilities. I get it. Fury can fight Usyk later. Who wins the aforementioned fights? I now lean toward Crawford in a close fight with Spence because he’s the better, more dynamic all-around boxer. And no active heavyweight can beat a focused, fit Fury. …

Boxing can be funny. Junior bantamweight titleholder Bam Rodiguez (17-0, 11 KOs) destroyed Carlos Cuadras and Srisaket Sor Rungvisai and then struggled on the Alvarez-Golovkin card against an opponent he was expected to handle easily, four-time title challenger Israel Gonzalez (28-5-1, 11 KOs). Rodriguez deserved the unanimous-decision victory but he had to work hard for it. Why? Give Gonzalez credit. The 25-year-old Mexican is a good, experienced fighter. And Rodriguez probably suffered somewhat of a let down after his life-changing victories earlier in the year. The 22-year-old from San Antonio deserves credit for getting the job done. And, of course, he remains a Fighter of the Year candidate. … Super middleweight contender Ali Akhmedov (19-1, 14 KOs) looked terrific in his shutout-decision victory over veteran Gabriel Rosado (26-16-1, 15 KOs) on the Alvarez-Golovkin card. Golovkin’s stable mate outboxed and outworked Rosado, who was never given a chance to get anything done. I’ll always wonder about Akhmedov’s chin light of his knockout loss to Carlos Gongora in 2020 but he clearly can fight. Rosado, 36, has now lost his last three fights. The end for the scrappy Philadelphia fighter is near.

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Report: Terence Crawford, Errol Spence Jr. agree to terms, targeting Nov. 19

Terence Crawford vs. Errol Spence Jr., the ultimate welterweight boxing match, is finally nearing finalization, according to reports.

The ultimate welterweight showdown appears to be on.

[autotag]Terence Crawford[/autotag] and [autotag]Errol Spence Jr.[/autotag] have agreed to “all material terms” for a fight for the undisputed 147-pound championship, although no contracts have been signed, according to ESPN, which cited multiple sources.

The outlet is reporting that organizers are targeting Nov. 19 in Las Vegas.

Crawford has agreed to accept less than 50% of the revenues. Also, a rematch clause will be in place regardless of who wins.

The matchup has been compared to other great welterweight clashes because of the status of the fighters. Crawford tops Boxing Junkie’s pound-for-pound list, Spence is No. 4.

However, it has been difficult to make the fight because the principals have been affiliated with competing handlers, Crawford (38-0, 29 KOs) with Top Rank and Spence (28-0, 22 KOs) with Premier Boxing Champions.

Crawford split from Top Rank late last year, which opened a wider path to an agreement.

Crawford, 34, is coming off a 10th-round knockout of Shawn Porter, his ninth consecutive stoppage. Spence, 32, stopped Yordenis Ugas in 10 to collect a third major title.

This story first appeared Thursday, Sept. 15 on Boxing Junkie.

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Report: Terence Crawford, Errol Spence Jr. agree to terms, targeting Nov. 19

Report: Terence Crawford and Errol Spence Jr. have agreed to terms for a fight targeted for Nov. 19 in Las Vegas.

The ultimate welterweight showdown appears to be on.

Terence Crawford and Errol Spence Jr. have agreed to “all material terms” for a fight for the undisputed 147-pound championship, although no contracts have been signed, according to ESPN, which cited multiple sources.

The outlet is reporting that organizers are targeting Nov. 19 in Las Vegas.

Crawford has agreed to accept less than 50% of the revenues. Also, a rematch clause will be in place regardless of who wins.

The matchup has been compared to other great welterweight clashes because of the status of the fighters. Crawford tops Boxing Junkie’s pound-for-pound list, Spence is No. 4.

However, it has been difficult to make the fight because the principals have been affiliated with competing handlers, Crawford (38-0, 29 KOs) with Top Rank and Spence (28-0, 22 KOs) with Premier Boxing Champions.

Crawford split from Top Rank late last year, which opened a wider path to an agreement.

Crawford, 34, is coming off a 10th-round knockout of Shawn Porter, his ninth consecutive stoppage. Spence, 32, stopped Yordenis Ugas in 10 to collect a third major title.

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Report: Terence Crawford, Errol Spence Jr. agree to terms, targeting Nov. 19

Report: Terence Crawford and Errol Spence Jr. have agreed to terms for a fight targeted for Nov. 19 in Las Vegas.

The ultimate welterweight showdown appears to be on.

Terence Crawford and Errol Spence Jr. have agreed to “all material terms” for a fight for the undisputed 147-pound championship, although no contracts have been signed, according to ESPN, which cited multiple sources.

The outlet is reporting that organizers are targeting Nov. 19 in Las Vegas.

Crawford has agreed to accept less than 50% of the revenues. Also, a rematch clause will be in place regardless of who wins.

The matchup has been compared to other great welterweight clashes because of the status of the fighters. Crawford tops Boxing Junkie’s pound-for-pound list, Spence is No. 4.

However, it has been difficult to make the fight because the principals have been affiliated with competing handlers, Crawford (38-0, 29 KOs) with Top Rank and Spence (28-0, 22 KOs) with Premier Boxing Champions.

Crawford split from Top Rank late last year, which opened a wider path to an agreement.

Crawford, 34, is coming off a 10th-round knockout of Shawn Porter, his ninth consecutive stoppage. Spence, 32, stopped Yordenis Ugas in 10 to collect a third major title.

[lawrence-related id=29518,29518]

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Long-awaited Errol Spence Jr.-Terence Crawford megafight reportedly slated for November

Boxing fans rejoice!

It’s already been an exceptional year for professional boxing — Errol Spence Jr. TKO’d Yordenis Ugas, Dmitry Bivol upset Canelo Alvarez, Gervonta Davis stopped Rolly Romero early and Oleksandr Usyk put on a clinic against Anthony Joshua.

All of that is great, but it’s about to get even better.

As reported by ESPN’s Mike Coppinger, the welterweight division’s two top dogs, Errol Spence Jr. and Terence ‘Bud’ Crawford, have agreed to terms on a megafight targeted for November 19 in Las Vegas.

Both of the undefeated fighters possess belts that would presumably be put on the line — Spence owns the WBC, WBA and IBF, and Crawford the WBO.

One of the more important details mentioned in Coppinger’s report is that the agreed-to fight includes a rematch clause.

“The package includes a bilateral rematch clause that the loser will have the right to exercise, per source. If the rematch clause is triggered, the winner will earn the majority of revenue for the return bout, per sources.”

We won’t look too far ahead though. As we lock-in on the likely November 19th fight, we can expect the hype of one of the most looked-forward-to bouts in a long time, to be lived up to.

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